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Forrest General Performs First Treo Abdominal Aortic Stent-Graft in Mississippi - Forrest Health
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    Published on November 24, 2020

    Forrest General Performs First Treo Abdominal Aortic Stent-Graft in Mississippi

    Members of the surgical team who conducted the state’s first Treo® Abdominal Aortic Stent-Graft last week at Forrest General Hospital. From left, Ron Doyle, Treo Graft representative; Tim Graham, RTR, Radiology Interventionalist; James Rogers, Radiology Technologist; Sourabh Mukherjee, M.D., FACS, RPVI, peripheral vascular surgeon; Jeremy Chance, CRNA, nurse anesthetist; Rebecca Bailey, surgical tech; Carley Edwards, surgical tech; Natalie Jones, RN.

    On Tuesday, the state’s first Treo® Abdominal Aortic Stent-Graft was performed at Forrest General Hospital by Sourabh Mukherjee, M.D., FACS, RPVI, a peripheral vascular surgeon. The graft that was used was recently approved by the FDA, but the pandemic slowed the use of the process down, so only about 30 have been done nationwide.

    The aneurysm repair procedure allows surgeons to now repair aneurysms percutaneously, meaning the procedure is done via a needle-puncture of the skin rather than using an “open” approach where a patient’s inner organs are exposed.

    “We don’t have to cut patients to introduce these devices,” said Mukherjee. “It’s a big deal, because the patient can go home the next day. This patient’s case was made somewhat challenging because the patient had a 5-centimenter aneurysm with disease in the wall of the aorta, but the procedure went flawlessly.” It was also made complex because the patient had a history of chronic smoking and peripheral arterial disease.

    The procedure lasted about one hour and was performed through the skin, so the patient only had two small glue marks at the site of the needle openings. “The patient will rest about two to four hours post-op and will pretty much be back to regular activity tomorrow when they will be discharged,” Mukherjee said.

    Mukherjee noted the operation has progressed considerably from the way it used to be done which required an open laparotomy, a surgical incision into the abdominal cavity, from top to bottom, which required massive volume shifts in organs, especially the intestines which had to be moved to the outside temporarily. “We used to have to prepare a patient like that since aneurysms of this nature are adjacent to the spine hidden underneath the intestines,” said Mukherjee. “So, you can see how different things are and how much we have progressed since the first graft was performed in 1990. Since then, technology has continued to get better, and now we are to the point where we are doing these procedures percutaneously.”

     


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