Some elements of our website may not load if you have an ad blocker turned on.

Appreciating Your Child's Personality - Forrest Health
    Share This
    Skip to main content

    Appreciating Your Child's Personality

    Topic Overview

    By the time a child starts school, his or her distinct temperament becomes more apparent. Every child has a unique way of feeling, thinking, and interacting with others. Some children are shy, while others are outgoing. Some are active, while others are calm. Some are fretful, while others are easygoing. Each family is composed of individuals who have their own distinct temperaments.

    Be careful not to dismiss your child's feelings because they don't match your expectations. For example, if you are outgoing and active, it may be hard for you to understand your child's shy behavior. Pushing your toddler into uncomfortable situations can erode rather than build his or her self-confidence.

    Accept and celebrate your child's uniqueness. Remember that your child is an individual. Although you can influence behavior to some degree, temperament is mostly inherited and typically a parent has little control over it. Allow your child to have his or her own personal preferences and feelings. And know these may be different from your own.

    References

    Other Works Consulted

    • American Academy of Pediatrics (2003, updated 2012). How to understand your child's temperament. Available online: http://www.healthychildren.org/English/ages-stages/gradeschool/Pages/How-to-Understand-Your-Childs-Temperament.aspx.

    Credits

    Current as ofMarch 27, 2018

    Author: Healthwise Staff
    Medical Review: Susan C. Kim, MD - Pediatrics
    Kathleen Romito, MD - Family Medicine
    Louis Pellegrino, MD - Developmental Pediatrics


    Related Locations


    Featured News

    • Forrest General Director Co-authors Professional Article for National Publication

      Lorie Mills, RHIT, CCS, director of Coding and CDI at Forrest General Hospital, co-authored an educational article for coders and other health information professionals titled AMI Documentation: Red Flags for CDI and Coding, which was published by American Health Information Management Association’s (AHIMA) website HIM Body of Knowledge.
      July 11, 2019