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Arthroplasty for Rheumatoid Arthritis - Forrest Health
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    Arthroplasty for Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Surgery Overview

    Arthroplasty is surgery done to reconstruct or replace a diseased joint. For rheumatoid arthritis, arthroplasty is done to restore function to a joint or correct a deformity. Bones in a joint can be reshaped. Or all or part of the joint can be replaced with metal, ceramic, or plastic parts.

    What To Expect

    Your doctor will let you know if you will stay in the hospital or if you can go home the day of surgery. Depending on the joint, rehabilitation may take several weeks to several months.

    Why It Is Done

    Surgery such as arthroplasty will not cure rheumatoid arthritis, nor will it stop disease activity. But if a joint is badly diseased, surgery may provide pain relief and improve function. Arthroplasty is considered when:

    • Symptoms can no longer be controlled with medicine, joint injections, physical therapy, and exercise.
    • Pain from rheumatoid arthritis can no longer be tolerated.
    • You are not able to do normal daily activities.
    • Narrowing of the joint space or wearing away of the cartilage and bone is causing severe pain or reduced range of motion.

    How Well It Works

    Arthroplasty can relieve pain and restore enough function in a joint to allow a person to do normal daily activities.footnote 1

    Risks

    Risks of arthroplasty include the risks of surgery and using anesthetic and the risks of:

    • Infection developing in the artificial joint (requires removal of the artificial joint and treatment of the infection).
    • Development of blood clots (thrombophlebitis).
    • Loosening of the joint.

    What To Think About

    To learn more about total knee and hip replacement surgery, see the topic Osteoarthritis.

    Success of arthroplasty depends in part on whether a person follows a rehabilitation program after surgery.

    References

    Citations

    1. Ekwall AKH, Firestein GS (2014). Rheumatoid arthritis: Treatment. In EG Nabel et al., eds., Scientific American Medicine, chap. 1032. Hamilton, ON: BC Decker. https://www.deckerip.com/decker/scientific-american-medicine/chapter/1032/pdf. Accessed December 15, 2016.

    Credits

    Current as of: April 1, 2019

    Author: Healthwise Staff
    Medical Review: Anne C. Poinier, MD - Internal Medicine
    Martin J. Gabica, MD - Family Medicine
    Kathleen Romito, MD - Family Medicine
    Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine
    Nancy Ann Shadick, MD, MPH - Rheumatology


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